This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.
 

Noticeboard

THE SURGERY DOORS ARE LOCKED AND WILL BE OPENED BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.


PLEASE WEAR A MASK OR FACE COVERING TO ANY APPOINTMENT.


For further advise on this and what to do if you would ordinarily attend surgery check 'Whilst the doors are locked' here (item 03).




A farewell message from Dr Thompson [Click to Read]




If you have symptoms associated with coronavirus including a new continuous cough and a high temperature, you are advised to stay at home for 7 days.


Do not book a GP appointment or attend your GP Practice.


If your symptoms are serious, or get worse, NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need further medical help and advise you what to do. 


Only call 119 if you cannot go online, or are advised to do so by the online service.  For the latest Covid-19 advice please visit www.nhs.uk/coronavirus


The surgery see's patients with long term conditions who could be extremely vulnerable.


We advise EVERYONE to check latest information and advice regarding the recent Coronavirus outbreak shared here (item 02).


If you need help support with domestic violence/ abuse during these unprecendted times please check here.



If you're struggling with anxiety/mental health issues during social isolation; you can contact the new 24 hour mental health emergency number:


0300 303 3972 



Please note our privacy notice has been added to during the pandemic you can check this here.


 




Online consultation is the best way to contact your GP whilst the social isolation measures are in place:


Please click here if you would like an online consultation.





 

Comments & Complaints

Comments, Complaints and Concerns

We value your opinion

We make every effort to give the best service possible to everyone who attends our practice.

However, we are aware that things can go wrong resulting in a patient feeling that they have a genuine cause for complaint. If this is so, we would wish for the matter to be settled as quickly, and as amicably, as possible. Simply contact the practice manager and they will set all the necessary wheels in motion.

If you have a complaint to make please dont be afraid to say how you feel. We welcome feedback to help us improve our standards and you will not be treated any differently if you have complained.We will just do our best to put right anything that has gone wrong. Your complaint will always be thoroughly investigated and we seek to come to a mutual understanding of what has gone wrong and to take any action that may be needed to put things right.

We aim to acknowledge all written complaints within three working days.  Some complaints will need to be discussed within the team and will take longer to respond to in full, but we will keep you informed about how long this will take.

Although all complaints are treated in confidence it may be necessary for doctors and staff to discuss clinical information.  They will only do this as far as necessary to investigate the complaint.

If a complaint is made by someone else on a patient’s behalf we will require the patient’s written consent to discuss their medical records and details of their care and treatment.  (This does not apply to patients under 16 years of age).

If you would like help or advice from an independent body then the ICAS (Independent Complaints Advocacy Service) can help:

Independent Complaints Advocacy Services

North West region

Tel: 0845 1203735

Although most complaints are resolved within the practice you can approach NHS England who we are contracted to and they will investigate the complaint on your behalf.  Please contact:

The Complaints manager

By telephone: 03003 11 22 33

By email: england.contactus@nhs.net

By post: NHS England, PO Box 16738, Redditch, B97 9PT

If you remain dissatisfied once the complaint has been dealt with you may seek further independent review from:

The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman
Millbank Tower
30 Millbank
London
SW1P 4QP

Tel:    0345 0154033

Website: www.ombudsman.org.uk

http://www.ombudsman.org.uk/make-a-complaint (to complain online or download a paper form). 

Confidentiality

files_1Everyone working for the NHS has a responsibility and a legal duty to protect your information, so that information is not disclosed to unauthorised bodies or people.

Information is recorded, either on paper or in computer files. However, it is all treated with the same strictly controlled confidential care. We need to be able to move electronic information from system to system, extracting the data and modifying it for the next system.

Tests will need to be made periodically on the data, to check that it has been transferred correctly. This is done under secure, carefully controlled conditions. The Law strictly controls the sharing of some types of very sensitive personal information. We are continually reviewing ways in which confidentially improvements can be made, and it is important for us to know and understand the views of patients and users of the service, including carers.

Freedom of Information

If you would like access to your medical records please apply in writing to the practice manager.

The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act was passed on 30 November 2000. It gives a general right of access to all types of recorded information held by public authorities, with full access granted in January 2005. The Act sets out exemptions to that right and places certain obligations on public authorities.

FOI replaced the Open Government Code of practice, which has been in operation since 1994.

Data Protection and FOI – how do the two interact?

The Data Protection Act 1998 came into force on 1 March 2000. It provides living individuals with a right of access to personal information held about them. The right applies to all information held in computerised form and also to non-computerised information held in filing systems structured so that specific information about particular individuals can retrieved readily.

Individuals already have the right to access information about themselves (personal data), which is held on computer and in some paper files under the Data Protection Act 1998.

The right also applies to those archives that meet these criteria. However, the right is subject to exemptions, which will affect whether information is provided. Requests will be dealt with on a case by case basis.

The Freedom of Information Act and the Data Protection Act are the responsibility of the Lord Chancellor’s Department. A few of its strategic objectives being:

  • To improve people’s knowledge and understanding of their rights and responsibilities
  • Seeking to encourage an increase in openness in the public sector
  • Monitoring the Code of practice on Access to Government Information
  • Developing a data protection policy which properly balances personal information privacy with the need for public and private organisations to process personal information

The Data Protection Act does not give third parties rights of access to personal information for research purposes.

The FOI Act does not give individuals access to their personal information, though if a request is made, the Data Protection Act gives the individual this right. If the individual chooses to make this information public it could be used alongside non-personal information gained by the public under the terms of the FOI Act.

 



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website